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Chinese Buddha Statue 观音Guan Yin, 关公Guan Gong, 福禄寿The San Xing - (D001-D003)

Chinese Buddha Statue 观音Guan Yin, 关公Guan Gong,  福禄寿The San Xing - (D001-D003)
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Product Code:
179
Model:
D001-D003
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Delivery:
Usually ships within 3-7 days
Delivery Fee:
West Malaysia - RM 10.00
East Malaysia - RM 14.00
Rewards:
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Highlights:
  • Boxwood Material Handcraft Item

  • Sanxing (福禄寿三星) ,Guan Gong (武财神关公) , Guan Yin (自在观音)

  • Suitable as gifts, decoration or praying as believe will bring good health & wealth.

  • Is good to place in office or home.

  • Size: (H) 10cm x (W) 13cm – When Opening it

  • Please Note: Due to Nature material & half handicraft, the product may have variance compare to the picture taken. 

 

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Product Information
  • Boxwood Material Handcraft Item

  • Sanxing (福禄寿三星) ,Guan Gong (武财神关公) , Guan Yin (自在观音)

  • Suitable as gifts, decoration or praying as believe will bring good health & wealth.

  • Is good to place in office or home.

  • Size: (H) 10cm x (W) 13cm – When Opening it

  • Please Note: Due to Nature material & half handicraft, the product may have variance compare to the picture taken. 

 

 

Guan Yin (自在观音)

Guanyin or Guan Yin (more at § Names in other Asian languages, below) is an East Asian bodhisattva associated with compassion as venerated by Mahayana Buddhists. She is commonly known as the "Goddess of Mercy" in English. The Chinese name Guanyin is short for Guanshiyin, meaning "[The One Who] Perceives the Sounds of the World". She is also referred to as Guanyin Bodhisattva (traditional Chinese: 觀世音菩薩; simplified Chinese: 观世音菩; pinyin: Guān shì Yīn Pú Sà).

Some Buddhists believe that when one of their adherents departs from this world, they are placed by Guanyin in the heart of a lotus, and then sent to the western Pure Land of Sukhāvatī.

Guanyin is often referred to as the "most widely beloved Buddhist Divinity" with miraculous powers to assist all those who pray to her, as is said in the Lotus Sutra and Karandavyuha Sutra.

Several large temples in East Asia are dedicated to Guanyin including Shitennoji, Sensoji, Kiyomizu-dera and Sanjusangendo as well as Shaolin. Guanyin is beloved by all Buddhist traditions in a non-denominational way and can be found in some of the most important Buddhist centers in India, including the Mahabodhi Temple, Ajanta Caves and Nalanda Museum as well as most Tibetan temples under the name Chenrezig. Furthermore, Guanyin can also be found in some influential Theravada temples such as Gangaramaya and Kelaniya of Sri Lanka. Statues can also be found in the Asian art sections of most museums in the world as a widely depicted subject of Asian art and sculpture.

 

Guan Gong (武财神关公)

Guan Yu is widely worshipped by the Chinese, and many shrines to him are found in homes, businesses and fraternal organisations. In Hong Kong, a shrine to Guan Yu can be found in every police station. Though by no means mandatory, Chinese police officers worship and pay respect to him. Although seemingly ironic, members of the triads and Heaven and Earth Society Worship Guan Yu as well. Statues used by triads tend to hold the halberd in the left hand, and statues in police stations tend to hold the halberd in the right hand. This signifies which side Guan Yu is worshipped, by the righteous people or vice versa. The appearance of Guan Yu's face for the triads is usually more stern and threatening than the usual statue. This exemplifies the Chinese belief that a code of honour, epitomised by Guan Yu, exists even in the criminal underworld. In Hong Kong, Guan Yu is often referred to as "Yi Gor" (二哥; Cantonese for "second elder brother") for he was second to Liu Bei in their fictional sworn brotherhood. Guan Yu is also worshipped by Chinese businessmen in Shanxi, Hong Kong, Macau and Southeast Asia as an alternative wealth god, since he is perceived to bless the upright and protect them from the wicked. Another reason is related to the release of Cao Cao during the Huarong Trail incident, in which he let Cao and his men pass through safely. For that, he was perceived to be able to extend the lifespan of people in need.

Among the Cantonese people who emigrated to California during the mid-19th century, the worship of Guan Yu was an important element. Statues and tapestry images of the god can be found in several historical California joss houses (a local term for Chinese folk religion temples), where his name may be given with various Anglicised spellings, including: Kwan Dai, Kwan Tai or Kuan Ti for Guandi (Emperor Guan); Kuan Kung for Guan Gong (Lord Guan), Wu Ti or Mo Dai for Wu Di (War Deity), Kuan Yu, Kwan Yu, or Quan Yu for Guan Yu. The Mendocino Joss House, a historical landmark also known as Mo Dai Miu (Wudimiao, i.e. the Temple of the Deity of War), or Temple of Kwan Tai, built in 1852, is a typical example of the small shrines erected to Guan Yu in the United States.

Guan Yu is also worshipped as a door god in Chinese and Taoist temples, with portraits of him being pasted on doors to ward off evil spirits, usually in pairings with Zhang Fei, Guan Ping, Guan Sheng, or Zhou Cang.

 

Sanxing (福禄寿三星)

The Sanxing (三星 "Three Stars"), who are Fu, Lu, and Shou (simplified Chinese: 福禄寿; traditional Chinese: 福祿壽; pinyin: Fú Lù Shòu), or Cai, Zi and Shou (財子壽), are the gods of the three stars and the three qualities of Prosperity (Fu), Status (Lu), and Longevity (Shou) in Chinese religion

The term is commonly used in Chinese culture to denote the three attributes of a good life. Statues of these three gods are found on the facades of folk religion's temples and ancestral shrines, in nearly every Chinese home and many Chinese-owned shops on small altars with a glass of water, an orange or other auspicious offerings, especially during Chinese New Year. Traditionally, they are arranged right to left (so Shou is on the left of the viewer, Lu in the middle, and Fu on the far right), just as Chinese characters are traditionally written from right to left.

Fuxing

The star of Fu (福), Fuxing 福星, refers to the planet Jupiter. In traditional astrology, the planet Jupiter was believed to be auspicious. Alternatively, according to a Taoist myth of the Ming dynasty, the Fu star is associated with Yang Cheng, a governor of Daozhou in Western Han (206 BC - 24 AD). Yang Cheng risked his life by writing a memorial to the emperor to save the people from presenting dwarf slaves as the special tribute to the imperial court. After his death, the people built a temple to commemorate him, and over time he came to be considered the personification of good fortune.

Luxing

The star of Lu (禄), Luxing 禄星, is ζ Ursa Majoris, or, in traditional Chinese astronomy, the sixth star in the Wenchang cluster, and like the Fu star came to be personified. The Lu star is believed to be Zhang Xian who lived during the Later Shu dynasty. The word lu specifically refers to the salary of a government official. As such, the Lu star is the star of prosperity, rank, and influence.

Shouxing

The star of Shou (壽), Shouxing 寿星, is α Carinae (Canopus), the star of the south pole in Chinese astronomy, and is believed to control the life spans of mortals. According to legend, he was carried in his mother's womb for ten years before being born, and was already an old man when delivered. He is recognized by his high, domed forehead and the peach which he carries as a symbol of immortality. The longevity god is usually shown smiling and friendly, and he may sometimes be carrying a gourd filled with the elixir of life. He is sometimes conflated with Laozi and corresponding gods of Taoist theology.

Chinese Buddha Statue 观音Guan Yin, 关公Guan Gong,  福禄寿The San Xing - (D001-D003)
Chinese Buddha Statue 观音Guan Yin, 关公Guan Gong,  福禄寿The San Xing - (D001-D003)
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Shipping Information
ZoneWeightDelivery Fee (RM)
West MalaysiaFirst 1.00 kg10.00
Additional 1.00 kg6.00
East MalaysiaFirst 1.00 kg14.00
Additional 1.00 kg12.00

 

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